Ligue 1 Trophy: Design, Name, Creator & Winners List

Lille win Ligue 1 trophy

Photo Credit: AP

The Ligue 1 trophy is known as the ‘Hexagoal’. This replaced the ‘le Trophée de Ligue 1’ in 2007.

One of the biggest leagues in world football, the top flight in France has been home to some all-time great footballers.

At the time of writing, perhaps the most potent front three of the 21st century resides in Paris, while megastars Sergio Ramos and Gianluigi Donnarumma have recently joined PSG, too.

Overmatched financially by its European peers, Ligue 1 has seldom been a destination league over the last decade or so aside from PSG’s record-breaking spending.

Lyon vs Reims in Ligue 1 trophy race

This hasn’t always been the case, however, with players like Rudi Völler, Chris Waddle and Ray Wilkins making the move to France during their playing days.

Lyon and PSG have each enjoyed spells of dominance in the 21st century, defending the Ligue 1 trophy for several years in a row. It’s not a competition without drama, though, with surprise champions including Montpellier and Lille in recent seasons.

You will have seen plenty of the Ligue 1 trophy, but how much do you know about it? We’ve done a bit of digging on the Hexagoal…

Ligue 1 Trophy Design

Argentine artist Pablo Reinoso designed and created the Hexagoal. It’s a perfectly smooth silver ball in the centre of a hexagonal ring shape.

Lifted by this bizarre outer hexagonal design, the trophy is large, and at extremely different from most sporting silverware.

The hexagon is believed to represent France. The ball is pretty self-explanatory. Reinoso’s work has had a mixed reception, with many criticising the design.

Chris Wright of ESPN ranked the Hexagoal as the sixth-best trophy among Europe’s major club silverware in 2021, however.

Naming

Replacing the previous trophy that had been in use for only a few years, you might be wondering how an unusual name like ‘Hexagoal’ comes about.

TF1 and the LFP teamed together to provide a competition to decide on the name of the new trophy. A whopping 9,000 proposals were sent in.

In May 2007, Frédéric Thiriez announced the name of the new trophy, which Lyon became the first club to win at the climax of the 2007-08 campaign.

On top of the league trophy, individual winners’ medals are also handed out. There are further pieces of hardware available at the UNFP awards, which take place once the season has finished.

Who Created The Ligue 1 Trophy?

Pablo Reinoso is a Franco-Argentinean, who has lived in France for over four decades.

An artist and designer, Reinoso first branched into football when he entered a competition in the early noughties to design the Coupe de la Ligue. Apprehensive at the prospect and how his form of art would be received, Reinoso stopped participating.

A few years later, though, Ligue 1 was back in touch with Reinoso after deciding to hand Andrée Putman’s trophy over to Lyon permanently.

According to Reinoso, the organisers of French football felt Putman’s effort ‘moved away from the football metaphor and came closer to something that was about fashion’.

Reinoso explained the criteria for the new Ligue 1 trophy.

“Something [that] brings France. Then it became clear to me that I had to have a hex, which is the identification of our country somewhere.

“League did not want it to be a cup, so there is no confusion with Coupe de la Ligue, Coupe de France and European trophies that also cut. They wanted a trophy.”

PSG Ligue 1 trophy

He went into further depth on how he ended up with such a unique creation.

“What I wanted was to force the players, and especially the captain, when he waved it to the public during the handover, to raise it with both hands. I wish it would be a special gesture that materializes the V-victory with the arms. And for that it must be big enough and quite heavy.

“It is about 1.5 kg heavier than the League Cup. And this difference of one kilo and a half means you cannot lift it with one arm.

“It’s a thing that scared the League a bit, but in the end it was not a problem. To finish, I also wanted a balloon and a hexagonal shape, that’s how I step by step, I realized this trophy.”

Reinoso also confirmed that there are two copies of the Hexagoal. One stays with the league, while the other is kept by the champions. The trophy is returned at the end of each season, with the winner getting a replica that’s about 20% smaller.

Ligue 1 Trophy Winners

  • 1932-33 – Olympique Lillois
  • 1933-34 – Sete
  • 1934-35 – Sochaux
  • 1935-36 – RC Paris
  • 1936-37 – Marseille
  • 1937-38 – Sochau
  • 1938-39 – Sete
  • 1939-45 – League suspended due to World War Two
  • 1945-46 – Lille
  • 1946-47 – Club Olympique de Roubaix Tourcoing
  • 1947-48 – Marseille
  • 1948-49 – Reims
  • 1949-50 – Bordeaux
  • 1950-51 – Nice
  • 1951-52 – Nice
  • 1952-53 – Reims
  • 1953-54 – Lille
  • 1954-55 – Reims
  • 1955-56 – Nice
  • 1956-57 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1957-58 – Reims
  • 1958-59 – Nice
  • 1959-60 – Reims
  • 1960-61 – Monaco
  • 1961-62 – Reims
  • 1962-63 – Monaco
  • 1963-64 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1964-65 – Nantes
  • 1965-66 – Nantes
  • 1966-67 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1967-68 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1968-69 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1969-70 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1970-71 – Marseille
  • 1971-72 – Marseille
  • 1972-73 – Nantes
  • 1973-74 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1974-75 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1975-76 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1976-77 – Nantes
  • 1977-78 – Marseille
  • 1978-79 – Strasbourg
  • 1979-80 – Nantes
  • 1980-81 – Saint-Etienne
  • 1981-82 – Monaco
  • 1982-83 – Nantes
  • 1983-84 – Bordeaux
  • 1984-85 – Bordeaux
  • 1985-86 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 1986-87 – Bordeaux
  • 1987-88 – Monaco
  • 1988-89 – Marseille
  • 1989-90 – Marseille
  • 1990-91 – Marseille
  • 1991-92 – Marseille
  • 1992-93 – Unattributed
  • 1993-94 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 1994-95 – Nantes
  • 1995-96 – Auxerre
  • 1996-97 – Monaco
  • 1997-98 – Lens
  • 1998-99 – Bordeaux
  • 1999-2000 – Monaco
  • 2000-01 – Nantes
  • 2001-02 – Lyon
  • 2002-03 – Lyon
  • 2003-04 – Lyon
  • 2004-05 – Lyon
  • 2005-06 – Lyon
  • 2006-07 – Lyon
  • 2007-08 – Lyon
  • 2008-09 – Bordeaux
  • 2009-10 – Marseille
  • 2010-11 – Lille
  • 2011-12 – Montpellier
  • 2012-13 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2013-14 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2014-15 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2015-16 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2016-17 – Monaco
  • 2017-18 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2018-19 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2019-20 – Paris Saint Germain
  • 2020-21 – Lille

*All photo credit on the site belongs to ap*

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